Tag Archives: Social Media

The Stuff of Social Media

22 Dec
...Pick up the *social* card?...

...Picking up the *social* card...

“Oh… it’s only a blog,” she murmured.
About this blog. Your blog. All blogs for that matter; we were talking about the stuff of social media.
I didn’t have a response at the time. I guess I was stuck searching for a rightfully witty comeback.

I couldn’t come up with anything, and later realised that this person- this ‘so called’ critic I was speaking too, didn’t even have a blog.

Pfffft.
WELL.

How can you possibly understand the concept of social media if you’re really not a participant?
And that is my question.
Of course you can understand it all on an intellectual level. Like, I understand heart surgery even though I’ve never studied it or needed it.
But you can never really get it unless you’ve really been in it. And unless you’ve been in it to win it in fact.

So let’s clarify something in my mind here for a minute. The blogosphere, I think, is one of the most valuable and personal forms of social media that exists out there.

And when people talk about authenticity, transparency and its engagement or some hot new social media tool, they’re really talking about that personal relationship of social media. That is, being less confined and alone in this great big world of teh interwebs.

So if you’re not participating and yes that means responding to blog comments and other blogs out there -or if you’re only talking to yourself on Twitter, you lose.

If you don’t actually participate, you’re not really a part of social media. You’re last year’s season.
Pretty much obsolete.
Outdated. Old-school.

And oh yes… traditional media.

‘Doing it’, or interacting is a big responsibility. This is why a lot of people – and a lot more companies – fail at social media. Because we all want to connect to people and ideas, but to do that you have to go ahead and open up. You have to expose that hidden secret, the stash of dark choclate in your desk, or the undisclosed plans for the mysterious year ahead. …Ahem…

But people fail because it takes alot to get yourself out there. I’m not that great at it, but I’m trying to be better because I understand that vulnerability is a good thing. Which in my books, is a start. But practicing it is something different entirely.

Social media is about analysing and defining your own ideas, opinions and passions.
You know, a two-way conversation, or more often than not those racy three-way+ comment agruments that YOU have started with a single opinion/blog post. And in being any way but alone, you discover value and a true understanding that is difficult to grasp if you’ve never even participated in the conversation in the first place.
So, bring it on.

*Image thanks to compfight.com & user Scr47chy.


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You woo me, but can you really win me?

24 Aug
So... Where are we going?

So... Where are we going?

Media has always been inherently social.

A few different blog spaces over the last week have me reflecting on the issue of ‘Social Media’ – where it’s come from, going to and the whole aspect or intent of it in the first place.

Stripped bare of its fundamental essence, media is quite simply a form of information communication.

With traditional media offerings, however, that communication process is typically one way. Product to person.

Nonetheless, it achieves a social dimension by providing a conversational context for audiences, and in this sense media is not only able to shape aspects of society, it becomes part of the social processes and norms too.
I mean, a leading headline for the day becomes a topic of gossip over breakfast. Popular dramas and movies spark discussion amongst the water cooler. Documentaries, events and books are topic for discussion and debate over dinner now.
Many a social acquaintance, friendship or relationship were even created through mutual interests in music, art, theatre, entertainment or topics of discussion that then became a mutual interest.

Media is social.
In a world which consumers have millions of content options, we are increasingly reliant on friends and associates to help us idenify and choose the media we consume. Our social interactions from this are playing a key role in our selection of entertainment choices; what we do, where we visit and what we use from then on. We want what we trust, naturally.

Secondly, socialisation is becoming an inherent feature of the entertainment product itself. A YouTube video becomes more valuable when a work colleague passes it on with a comment about how funny they found it. – A cancer awareness email campaign is more solemn when a friend of a friend adds a note about how the disease affected their life. – And then videos about social media and objects of discussion resonate more when you watch it on the blog of a friend who unravels the topic and identifies it throughout their own social experience.

Entertainment media has always relied on word-of-mouth promotion, which is something i find intrinsically valuable. Uncontrollable and interesting though, content has always been influenced by the manner it was selected for consumption.
What is different is that it is becoming increasingly rare to consume entertainment content in the absence of any social interaction. This, in turn, is changing our perception of entertainment; if my friends aren’t doing it, I’m not going to either – right?
Or more to the point; if you don’t draw me in enough to experience, talk about and share with my friends, you’re going nowhere fast.
This poses some real issues for those entertainment options which remain locked with dim, brassbound distribution channels, impervious to an audiences’ attempt to socialise them. …So what happens next?

Ideas anyone?

Image thanks to Matthew Strong and Flickr Storm